cerespolicyresearch
advancing youth and community well-being

Ceres Policy Research - Focus

Ceres Policy Research advances youth and community well-being through research and strategic planning. We use a healing-informed approach to build alternatives to exclusionary school discipline and the juvenile justice system. Our work aims to end the over-punishment of young people due to race, gender identity, gender expression, and sexual orientation. 

 

focus

Ceres Policy Research advances youth and community well-being through research and strategic planning. We use a healing-informed approach to build alternatives to exclusionary school discipline and the juvenile justice system. Our work aims to end the over-punishment of young people due to race, gender identity, gender expression, and sexual orientation.

 

Improving Well-Being

All of our research is primarily concerned with improving the well-being of youth and communities that are disproportionately impacted by exclusionary school discipline practices and the justice system. Our multi-system data analysis often begins with reduced suspensions, expulsions, and recidivism to measure success, However, we always aim to capture outcomes such as improvements in relationships with adults, relationships with peers, attachment to school, emerging identities as leaders, and connection to community history as more holistic measures of youth well-being,

2003-2017 Barrios Unidos.  Ceres has completed multiple projects with Barrios Unidos including two program evaluations and some contract monitoring.  Most recently, Ceres is partnering with Barrios Unidos to develop a policy brief on the overrepresentation of Latinos in California. The Barrios Unidos evaluation packet was developed by Ceres and includes a wide range of youth well-being measures.

2005-2010 One Circle Foundation.  Ceres completed multiple projects including analysis of national data, a national program evaluation, and an evaluation of a local site funded by Title II. The Girls Circle evaluation packet was developed by Ceres and includes a wide range of youth well-being measures that are grounded in the 40 developmental assets developed by the Search Institute.

Photo Credit: Llewelyn Nys

Photo Credit: Llewelyn Nys


Photo Credit: Joe Pizzio

Photo Credit: Joe Pizzio

improving school outcomes

Youth of color, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, questioning, gender nonconforming, and transgender youth of color, experience disproportionate suspensions and expulsions.  Dr. Irvine has spent the past year and a half at Impact Justice--where she continues as a Senior Fellow--building a collaboration of counties in California that are matching school and justice data to build off-ramps from exclusionary discipline and incarceration. Ceres aims to develop partnerships with county agencies working to reverse this trend and build bridges to post-secondary education opportunities. The following projects provide examples of collaborations with such forward-thinking partners:

2017 Analysis of Data from Charlotte-Mecklenberg, North Carolina. Ceres is analyzing child welfare, school discipline, and justice data to identify how wraparound services might improve school outcomes for youth.


improving youth Justice Outcomes

As with exclusionary school discipline, youth of color, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, questioning, gender nonconforming, and transgender youth of color, experience disproportionate arrest and incarceration rates. Ceres works with justice stakeholders to build bridges to success. The following project provides an example:

2017 Central Region of California SOGIE Data Collection Project. Dr. Irvine is working with twelve justice systems in the Central Region of California to collect sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression (SOGIE) data.  We will then conduct data analysis that provides information that will be used to improve outcomes for youth.

Photo Credit: Allef Vinicius

Photo Credit: Allef Vinicius